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  • Writer's pictureK Beauty Hobbit

Some By Mi Snail Truecica Miracle Repair Serum Review

This post contains affiliate links. Product provided by Jolse.


Some By Mi Snail Truecica Miracle Repair Serum, available on Jolse, is a multipurpose product to brighten the skin and help with signs of aging. The star ingredients are snail filtrate, niacinamide, and a proprietary ingredient Truecica™. It promises to repair, strengthen, and soothe the skin.


How to use

  • Apply after toner

  • Pat in for better absorption

  • Follow with moisturizer / spf (in the morning)


The serum is colorless and has the slippery gel-like texture often found in snail products (except less “stretchy” than most). I notice a slight tea tree / sage scent which doesn’t linger.

Some By Mi Snail Truecica Miracle Repair Serum

My impressions

Back in December 2022, I won a gift package from a vendor that included a few small bottles of Some By Mi serums. Most of them weren’t new to me - I love the yuja one (review here) and am wildly unimpressed with the aha bha line as a whole. But the bottle of Truecica was my first one ever. I fell in love with the texture and knew I had to get the full size to see if it provided good results and not just a great sensory feeling.


I have combination skin that’s not sensitive but is prone to redness (simply because I’m very fair and every little thing like itching shows up bright red). I love this serum - the texture and application process are fantastic. It glides over the skin providing pleasant slip without any stickiness and works well under day or nighttime moisturizers (I mostly use this at night).

Some By Mi Snail Truecica Miracle Repair Serum

I’m not sure I would go for this if I had reactive, sensitive, or actively breaking out skin. The formula is full of essential oils (that seems to be the case with most of Some By Mi products), which are known potential irritants. I have a huge issue with this brand marketing their products as soothing, calming, and great for sensitive skin while including ingredients like bergamot oil. Yes, there are also soothing centella derivatives, but were bergamot and sage truly necessary too? And why say that it passed the “skin irritation test” - that’s not a universal guarantee that someone won’t have a reaction. I have no issues with the product or even its ingredients, but the marketing is misleading.


Anyway, proceed with caution if your skin is sensitive or reactive. Mine isn’t. And for what it’s worth, even the AHA BHA miracle line has a cult following, yet I find it irritating in more ways than one.

Back to the Truecica serum - it’s a staple in my evening routine and I see plumping and softening effects, probably from willow bark and snail. My skin loves it. If I have an active breakout, I reach for other products, but otherwise Truecica is a frequent flier in my evening self care.



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Some By Mi Snail Truecica Miracle Repair Serum ingredients: Water, Butylene Glycol, Niacinamide, 1,2-Hexanediol, Snail Secretion Filtrate, C12-14 Pareth-12, C12-14 Pareth-7, Carbomer, Tromethamine, Dioscorea Japonica Root Extract, Trehalose, Ethylhexylglycerin, Beta-Glucan, Hydrolyzed Corn Starch, Citrus Aurantium Bergamia (Bergamot) Fruit Oil, Allantoin, Adenosine, Disodium EDTA, Sucrose, Melaleuca Alternifolia (Tea Tree) Leaf Extract, Glycyrrhiza Glabra (Licorice) Root Extract, Agrimonia Eupatoria Extract, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Oil, Centella Asiatica (Gotu Kola) Extract, Salvia Officinalis (Sage) Leaf Extract, Camellia Sinensis (Green Tea) Leaf Extract, Chamaecyparis Obtusa Leaf Extract, Silybum Marianum Seed Extract, Perilla Frutescens Leaf Extract, Sodium Chondroitin Sulfate, Broussonetia Kazinoki Root Extract, Propolis Extract, Artemisia Capillaris Extract, Cimicifuga Dahurica Root Extract, Salix Alba (Willow) Bark Extract, Pentylene Glycol, Madecassoside, Oenothera Biennis (Evening Primrose) Flower Extract, Asiaticoside, Asiatic Acid, Madecassic Acid, Phenoxyethanol


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